The Left Hand of Darkness at Fifty

Charlie Jane Anders, The Left Hand of Darkness at Fifty

The Left Hand of Darkness was published fifty years ago, but still packs as much power as it did in 1969. Maybe even more so, because now more than ever we need its core story of two people learning to understand each other in spite of cultural barriers and sexual stereotypes. 

Adrian Tchaikovsky, Children of Time (2015)

Image shows the cover of Children of Time. It features a spaceship approaching a green planet.

In the far distant future, Dr Avrana Kern is about to realise her dream of observing the evolution of sentience in a species.  She’s found the perfect planet, has developed a special sentience virus and acquired a shipload of monkeys to be deposited on their new world.  But disaster strikes! The ship is destroyed on the way to the planet and Dr Kern, unable to return home, leaves an Artificial Intelligence in charge of her satellite and puts herself into the stasis in the hope of one day being rescued. What she doesn’t realise is that, although the monkeys didn’t make it, her virus did and, guess what, the planet isn’t actually uninhabited ….

A long, long time passes.

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Babylon 5 – ‘Sleeping in Light’

Image shows the actors Bruce Boxleitner and Mira Furlann in their roles as John Sheridan and Delenn. They are pictured from the next up, in profile watching the sun rise off screen.

Twitter reminded me that today is the twentieth broadcast anniversary of the final episode of Babylon 5, ‘Sleeping in Light‘. The episode is set twenty years in the future and follows John Sheridan and his friends as they prepare for his death while, at the same time, the station is being decommissioned.

I remember crying all day after watching ‘Sleeping in Light’. But I was crying in a good ‘I’m sad but satisfied’ kind of way. If I have any criticism of the episode, I feel it’s a little self-indulgent about Sheridan. I would also have very much liked to find out what happened to Lyta and Lennier, but they may have been planning to tell those stories in spin-offs and sequels that never happened. Still, it’s a beautiful finale that respects the integrity of the characters and the story and, overall, feels right.

I owe a lot to Babylon 5. It got me through some difficult times in my early twenties. At one point, I had terrible insomnia and the only way I could get to sleep was to put on an episode and watch until I dropped off.

As well as being an absolute masterpiece of character-driven arc storytelling, I think Babylon 5 proves that a strong creator can engage thoughtfully with the fans and maintain artistic integrity, without ever becoming emotionally manipulative, exploitative or even abusive.

Now that it really is twenty years later, Babylon 5 is still a story I can return to and rely on to be there for me when I need it and that’s really precious.

Perhaps its time for a re-watch.

SF Link Round-up

Following the Guardian’s male-centred article about fantasy, and the #womeninfantasy pushback on twitter, Senny Dreadful posts some thoughts and a massive reading list: Women in Fantasy: Disrupting in Circle

Africa is a Country has a piece on the ways in which African and Afro-diasporic writers are pushing the boundaries of science fiction The Aliens Have Already Landed: The Landscape of African and Afro-Diasporic Science Fiction

A new crowd-funded anthology, Defying Doomsday, will place disabled characters at the forefront of the narrative.

The Kirkus published a good longread on the work of the amazing Joanna Russ, The Radical Joanna Russ

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SF Link Round-up

The BBC will be hosting a Science Fiction Season this month.

New Interview with Ursula Le Guin over at Salon.com

This forthcoming documentary sounds amazing: Invisible Universe: A History of Blackness in Speculative Fiction

I really liked this piece: On Interstellar, Plot Holes, and Letting Stories be Themselves  (via BethanVJones)

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